EcoMall

SPRING GARDENING AND COMPOST

Most children love worms, digging their hands into soil and picking nutritious foods grown in backyard gardens - all the while learning about earth's natural cycles. Part of a wholesome gardening experience is composting.

Environmental advocates will happily explain the Do's & Don'ts to create quality compost. You don't have to be a dedicated gardener. Simply find a suitable location to place your composter and begin:

DO'S -

* Start with a base layer of brush to provide airflow. When you deposit kitchen organics, include a handful of dry leaves. Wet kitchen 'greens' provide the nitrogen, while dry 'browns' add the carbon. Microbes will thrive in the right balance.

* Food will decompose quicker if chopped into smaller pieces.

* Your compost should be as damp as a wrung-out sponge. Too wet? Add more leaves or ripped up cardboard.

* Turning your compost periodically will increase its heat and organics will decompose quicker, but this is not necessary.

* As the decaying process is much slower during the winter, you could run out of room if your composter is too full by autumn. To start the winter with an empty composter, wiggle it loose from your heap just before the frost. Add leaves and begin again. It may fill to the rim, but as soon as warm weather arrives the volume will quickly decrease. Keep a supply of dry leaves or other browns on hand to add the carbon. Topple the existing heap, add more leaves and cover with a tarp to use in the spring.

* Compost should just have an earthy scent. However, if there is an odor, top with dry leaves and a few shovels of earth.

* You can include bits of rope, string, cooled wood ashes, sawdust from untreated wood, feathers, wool, hair and pet fur. A rule of thumb is: 'if it was once alive, it will decompose.'

DON'TS -

* Do not include meats, bones, dairy or oils. These materials do not break down quickly and may cause odors that could encourage animals.

* Citrus fruits and vinegar are best left out of a worm bin, the habitat for red wiggler worms.

* If you add grass clippings, do not add too many at one time.

Compost is more than a soil conditioner; it is a symbol of continuing life. In the 5 book series 'Pee Wee at Castle Compost', the beetles sing their compost song to the tune of the Hokey Pokey:

'You put your wet greens in, You spread your dry browns out, You add a little water and you stir it all about, You invite all your bug friends To have a two-month feast, Then shovel your compost out!'

Designed as an educational tool, the fun and factual illustrated adventure stories not only help teachers explain the benefits of composting, but also engage children and their parents.

Click below to e-mail this article to a friend
or to post a link on your favorite sites.
Thank you! Bookmark and Share

Written by:Larraine Roulston, Castle Compost


RELATED LINKS:



Shop by Keywords Above or by Categories Below.

AIR PURIFICATION AROMATHERAPY BABIES
BEDDING BIRDING BODY CARE
BOOKS BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS
CAMPING CATALOGUES CLASSIFIEDS
CLEANING PRODUCTS CLOTHING COMPUTER PRODUCTS
CONSTRUCTION CONSULTANTS CRAFTS
ECO KIDS ECO TRAVEL EDUCATION
ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENT HOMES ENGINEERING
FITNESS-YOGA FLOWERS FOODS
FOOTWEAR FURNITURE GARDEN
GIFTS HARDWARE HEMP
HERBS HOUSEHOLD INDUSTRY
INVESTMENTS JEWELRY LIGHTING
MAGAZINES MUSIC NATURAL HEALTH
NATURAL PEST CONTROL NEW AGE OFFICE
OUTDOORS PAPER PETS
PROMOTIONAL RESOURCES RECYCLED SAFE ENVIRONMENTS
SEEKING CAPITAL SHELTERS SOLAR-WIND
TOYS TRANSPORTATION VIDEOS
VITAMINS WATER WEATHER
WHOLESALE WOOD HOW TO ADVERTISE

 Green Living Magazine
Updated Daily!

* * * IN-HOUSE RESOURCES * * *
WHAT'S NEW ACTIVISM ALERTS DAILY ECO NEWS
LOCAL RESOURCES DATABASE ASK THE EXPERTS ECO CHAT
ECO FORUMS ARTICLES ECO QUOTES
INTERVIEWS & SPEECHES NON-PROFIT GROUPS ECO LINKS
KIDS LINKS RENEWABLE ENERGY GOVERNMENT/EDUCATION
VEGGIE RESTAURANTS ECO AUDIO/VIDEO EVENTS
COMMUNICATIONS WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING ACCOLADES
AWARDS E-MAIL MAILING LIST


EcoMall