EcoMall


HOW TO AVOID
CHEMICAL LADEN CARPETS

When the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) came down with "sick building syndrome" in its Washington, D.C. headquarters back in 1988, the irony was lost on no one. Health problems there erupted after installation of new carpeting, but the cause was never clearly identified. Suspicion hovered around chemical by-product emissions from carpet backing or adhesives, including something called 4-phenylcyclohexene (4-PC). The EPA finally replaced the carpet with a different, urethane-backed version, which solved the problem.

In 1992, at her Dedham, Massachusetts lab, Dr. Rosalind Anderson killed a quarter of her test mice with air drawn from carpet samples she had heated. EPA scientists ran similar tests and failed to duplicate Anderson's alarming results. That, says Indiana house-builder John Bower, is because the EPA didn't precisely duplicate Anderson's protocol. Bower and his chemically-sensitive wife, Lynn, have written books on environmental illnesses and healthy house construction.

The carpet industry has its own scientific experts who say there's nothing to worry about, but with as many as 40 chemicals in every new piece of carpet, there's reason for concern. For those with multiple chemical sensitivity, bare ceramic tile seems to be the best answer. Some consumers avoid wall-to-wall floor covering, preferring all-cotton or wool area rugs over wood, ceramic or inert vinyl flooring. All-wool carpeting is available from Carousel Carpet Mills and Helios Carpets, and cotton carpets are made by Dellinger. But even natural fibers collect particulates like lead or hydrocarbons tracked in from outside, and vacuuming, says Bower, doesn't remove microscopic particles, it just blows them around and re-deposits them. "Carpet is a reservoir for this stuff," he says. "Then you put the kids down to play on it because it's soft. But it's a horrible place for kids to play."

Click below to e-mail this article to a friend
or to post a link on your favorite sites.
Thank you! Bookmark and Share

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE -->

Written by: Judy Waytiuk.


RELATED LINKS:





Shop by Keywords Above or by Categories Below.

AIR PURIFICATION AROMATHERAPY BABIES
BEDDING BIRDING BODY CARE
BOOKS BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS
CAMPING CATALOGUES CLASSIFIEDS
CLEANING PRODUCTS CLOTHING COMPUTER PRODUCTS
CONSTRUCTION CONSULTANTS CRAFTS
ECO KIDS ECO TRAVEL EDUCATION
ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENT HOMES ENGINEERING
FITNESS-YOGA FLOWERS FOODS
FOOTWEAR FURNITURE GARDEN
GIFTS HARDWARE HEMP
HERBS HOUSEHOLD INDUSTRY
INVESTMENTS JEWELRY LIGHTING
MAGAZINES MUSIC NATURAL HEALTH
NATURAL PEST CONTROL NEW AGE OFFICE
OUTDOORS PAPER PETS
PROMOTIONAL RESOURCES RECYCLED SAFE ENVIRONMENTS
SEEKING CAPITAL SHELTERS SOLAR-WIND
TOYS TRANSPORTATION VIDEOS
VITAMINS WATER WEATHER
WHOLESALE WOOD HOW TO ADVERTISE

 Green Living Magazine
Updated Daily!

* * * IN-HOUSE RESOURCES * * *
WHAT'S NEW ACTIVISM ALERTS DAILY ECO NEWS
LOCAL RESOURCES DATABASE ASK THE EXPERTS ECO CHAT
ECO FORUMS ARTICLES ECO QUOTES
INTERVIEWS & SPEECHES NON-PROFIT GROUPS ECO LINKS
KIDS LINKS RENEWABLE ENERGY GOVERNMENT/EDUCATION
VEGGIE RESTAURANTS ECO AUDIO/VIDEO EVENTS
COMMUNICATIONS WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING ACCOLADES
AWARDS E-MAIL MAILING LIST


EcoMall