EcoMall

GREENPEACE MOURNS DEATH OF
ENVIRONMENTAL WARRIOR

Greenpeace is mourning the death of David McTaggart, Honorary Chairman and of one of the founders of the international environmental organization.

David died in a car crash near his home in Umbria, Italy.

"We are all deeply shocked by this news. Greenpeace would not be what it is today without his amazing force behind it," said interim International Executive Director Gerd Leipold.

David played a pivotal role in the first Greenpeace protest against French nuclear testing at Moruroa in the South Pacific in 1972, and returned there the following year. Pressure from the organisation finally resulted in the atmospheric nuclear tests being cancelled, and his determination played a massive part in that success.

He also was key to the campaign to stop commercial whaling and the creation of the South Ocean Whale Sanctuary. His work to achieve lasting protection of Antarctica from commercial exploitation of it's mineral wealth is perhaps one of his greatest triumphs.

"Greenpeace would be unthinkable without his force of personality. He built up the organisation into the International pressure group it is today, opening offices in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, when no one believed it possible. Not only is he a great loss to Greenpeace, but also to the environmental movement worldwide, added Leipold.

David Fraser McTaggart: 1932-2001

David McTaggart was among the chief contributors to the creation of the environmentalist group Greenpeace. He was the organisation's chief spokesman and chairman of Greenpeace International from 1979 until 1991. The Canadian businessman had become involved with the issue of French atmospheric nuclear weapons testing in New Zealand in 1971, and his life was tied to environmental issues from then on.

McTaggart was born in Vancouver, British Columbia, on June 24, 1932. As a youth he was an outstanding athlete whose interests included skiing, tennis, squash, and golf. He won the Canadian National Badminton championship in the singles division three years running.

McTaggart worked in the construction business for twenty years, moving to the United States in the 1960s where he became a successful contractor and developer. When an explosion destroyed a resort lodge built by his firm, seriously injuring an employee, the deeply affected McTaggart left the business and went into semi-retirement, sailing for pleasure in the Pacific. In 1972 he became outraged with the French Government's decision to cordon off a vast swath of international waters in order to conduct their nuclear testing program in the Pacific. He renamed his 12.6 meter sailing craft "Greenpeace III" and sailed to the zone surrounding Moruroa Atoll. McTaggart observed international law in establishing his anchor position, but ignored the French Government's unilateral declaration of the area as a forbidden zone. The presence of his boat, at a position downwind from the planned blast, forced the French government to halt its test. A French Navy vessel eventually rammed the boat to end the embarrassing situation. McTaggart repaired his boat and returned a year later. He was physically beaten by French military personnel, who denied the charge, claiming that McTaggart's ship had already left the area. One of McTaggart's crew had photographed the beating, however, and the film, which was smuggled out of French custody with the crewmember, proved the French had been lying. The photographs were widely published, and the story drew further criticism to the French nuclear testing program.

McTaggart entered into lengthy litigation against the French. In 1974 he won part of his case, a landmark decision in which the French courts sided against the French government. That same year, the French announced that they would end their atmospheric nuclear testing program.

In 1977 McTaggart began organising new support throughout Europe for Greenpeace, by then established in nine countries. In 1979 he forged an international alliance between separate factions of the organisation and united them under his chairmanship as Greenpeace International.

Between 1975 and 1991, McTaggart was a driving force behind Greenpeace campaigns to save the whales, stop the dumping of nuclear waste in the ocean, block the production of toxic wastes, end nuclear testing, and protect the Antarctic continent from oil and mineral exploitation. Over the length of his career he published numerous articles and two books. Awards for his contributions to environmentalism world-wide include the Onassis Award, The Kreisky Prize, and the United Nations Environmental Programme's Global 500 Award.

In September of 1991, McTaggart retired from active chairmanship of Greenpeace International to a farm in Italy, where he raised organic olive oil and continued to work on whaling and other issues through his own foundation.

Written by: Greenpeace


RELATED LINKS:



Shop by Keywords Above or by Categories Below.

AIR PURIFICATION AROMATHERAPY BABIES
BEDDING BIRDING BODY CARE
BOOKS BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS
CAMPING CATALOGUES CLASSIFIEDS
CLEANING PRODUCTS CLOTHING COMPUTER PRODUCTS
CONSTRUCTION CONSULTANTS CRAFTS
ECO KIDS ECO TRAVEL EDUCATION
ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENT HOMES ENGINEERING
FITNESS-YOGA FLOWERS FOODS
FOOTWEAR FURNITURE GARDEN
GIFTS HARDWARE HEMP
HERBS HOUSEHOLD INDUSTRY
INVESTMENTS JEWELRY LIGHTING
MAGAZINES MUSIC NATURAL HEALTH
NATURAL PEST CONTROL NEW AGE OFFICE
OUTDOORS PAPER PETS
PROMOTIONAL RESOURCES RECYCLED SAFE ENVIRONMENTS
SEEKING CAPITAL SHELTERS SOLAR-WIND
TOYS TRANSPORTATION VIDEOS
VITAMINS WATER WEATHER
WHOLESALE WOOD HOW TO ADVERTISE

 Green Living Magazine
Updated Daily!

* * * IN-HOUSE RESOURCES * * *
WHAT'S NEW ACTIVISM ALERTS DAILY ECO NEWS
LOCAL RESOURCES DATABASE ASK THE EXPERTS ECO CHAT
ECO FORUMS ARTICLES ECO QUOTES
INTERVIEWS & SPEECHES NON-PROFIT GROUPS ECO LINKS
KIDS LINKS RENEWABLE ENERGY GOVERNMENT/EDUCATION
VEGGIE RESTAURANTS ECO AUDIO/VIDEO EVENTS
COMMUNICATIONS WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING ACCOLADES
AWARDS E-MAIL MAILING LIST


EcoMall