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NICOTINE DETOXIFICATION PROGRAM

No support program for smokers will be as effective as simply stopping. Even at that, your body needs to replenish nutrients lost and organs damaged from smoking. A wholesome diet and nutritional supplements will help restore nutrients and lead you back to the road of health.

Adequate fruits, vegetables and whole grains will help provide some of the necessary and protective antioxidant nutrients needed to restore health to the body. Beta-carotene, vitamins A, C, and E, and selenium will all help lower risks of cancer and other smoking maladies. In addition, some raw seeds and nuts, legumes, sprouts, and other proteins should be consumed. Water is an essential nutrient to balance out the drying effect of smoking. A daily intake of two to three quarts is suggested, depending on how many high-water-content fruits and vegetables, salads, and soups are consumed. Caffeine beverages increase the need for water, as they are also dehydrating. Smoking usually generates a mild acidic condition in the body; an alkaline diet is helpful to balance this condition. A high-fiber diet also helps in detoxification by maintaining bowel function, which is necessary to remove toxins from the body. The overall plan for smokers is to increase the wholesome foods - fruits, vegetables, and whole grains - and to lower the intake of fats, cured or pickled products, food additives, and alcohol.

An alkaline diet is important during the cigarette withdrawal and detoxification period. The increased blood alkalinity that results from a diet high in fruits and vegetables, mainly raw food consumption, helps reduce the craving and interest in smoking. Studies have shown this to be true and according to Dr. Elson M. Haas, Staying Healthy with Nutrition, he has heard this regularly from the hundreds of patients seen in smoking cessation programs. An alkaline diet does not necessarily have to be a lifelong program, but can help during the cigarette withdrawal period.

The diet for detoxification is low in fat and high in fiber. It is important to keep the energy and bowels moving. The raw foods (and vegetarian) diet helps with both. This includes several salads of leafy greens daily, and some snacks of fruits, vegetables, nuts, or seeds. Some of the high protein algae, such as spirulina and chorella, also help during the withdrawal and detoxification period.

SAMPLE STOP SMOKING DIET

Increase Alkaline Foods - Reduce Acid Foods - fruits - figs - meats - beef - vegetables - raisins - sugar - chicken - greens - carrots - wheat - eggs - lima beans - celery - bread - milk - millet - almonds - baked - goods - cheese.

SUPPLEMENTATION

Many supplements are useful for smokers or during withdrawal and detoxification. When urine is acidic, it increases the elimination of nicotine and thus increases the craving. So, while an alkaline diet may slow down the detoxification of nicotine, it also reduces the desire to smoke. It is said that sodium or potassium bicarbonate tablets, along with a fruit and vegetable based, high-fiber diet can help with the cravings during the withdrawal period.

A good general "multiple" vitamin with additional antioxidant nutrients are part of the "stop smoking" program. Antioxidants help reduce the toxicity of smoking and help lessen the free-radical irritation during the detoxification period. This is true for primary smokers and those affected by secondary smoke inhalation. Vitamin E, 400-800 IUs daily, specifically helps stabilize the cell membranes and protects them and the tissue membranes from the free-radical and chemical irritations generated by cigarette smoke. Selenium, as sodium selenite or selenomethionine, at a level of 200-300 mcg, supports vitamin E and also reduces cancer potential, which is so much higher with chronic smoking. Selenium also lessens sensitivity to cadmium. Vitamin A reduces cancer risk and supports tissue health and beta-carotene specifically protects against lung cancer in smokers. Smoking clearly depletes body vitamin C levels, probably by increasing antioxidant demands and reducing absorption. Supplementing 1,000 - 2,500 mg. daily is beneficial. Extra zinc, 30-60 mg. a day, like vitamin A, helps protect the tissue and mucous membrane health.

There are many other helpful nutrients needed during smoking and detoxification. First, we need to support the B vitamins that are more easily depleted in smokers, mainly thiamine (B1), pyridoxine (B6), and cobalamin (B12). The B12 may also help to decrease the cellular damage caused by tars and nicotine. Niacin (B3) helps in opening up the circulation that is constricted with nicotine. It also lowers cholesterol, which may reduce the risk of atherosclerosis.

Pantothenic acid may reduce aging of the skin and will help support a generally stressful lifestyle. Folic acid and choline are also important as well as Coenzyme Q10. Other important minerals required in higher levels as you go through the detoxification period may include: magnesium and molybdenum; zinc; copper if taking higher doses of zinc; L-cysteine; B1 (thiamine) and vitamin C.

Zinc helps reduce cadmium absorption and toxicity. One thing to remember is that the toxic cadmium content of smoke interferes with the body's metabolism of zinc; as a result higher doses of zinc are required while smoking. Vitamin B1 and vitamin C protects the lungs from smoking damage and from acetaldehyde generated by smoke.

To prevent obesity, it is very important to be aware of eating habits during the smoking cessation period. Smoking reduces the appetite and the taste for foods and can increase metabolism as well as nervous energy. It is natural to want to eat more and enjoy foods more when not smoking. If weight-gain is not desirable, a weight-control diet can be instituted as smoking is stopped. The alkaline, high-fiber, low-fat diet is helpful in maintaining weight. More choline may improve fat utilization, as may the amino acid L-carnitine. Regular exercise, walking, and getting used to breathing deeply of the fresh air are also part of the new plan.

SMOKING CESSATION

Some people experience several side effects during the withdrawal period. The first 12-24 hours can be the most difficult. Cigarette craving is almost always present. Headaches, anxiety, irritability, dizziness, and insomnia are fairly common. Other smoking withdrawal symptoms include muscle aches, sore mouth, inability to concentrate, drowsiness, heart palpitations and depression. Gastrointestinal upset is also common and can include symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, cramps, diarrhea, or constipation.

Make a commitment when deciding to quit smoking. Know your cigarette triggers and work to defuse them before picking up that next cigarette. Get rid of ashtrays (or at least put them away), clean your teeth and your home. Rid your surroundings of items that hold the smell of cigarette smoke such as drapes, carpets and clothes. An air cleaner is also helpful to rid your home of the lingering effects of smoke. Keep your air clean and allow your lungs the opportunity to function more efficiently.

Many beneficial herbs have been used to help with withdrawal and detoxification. Peppermint is a popular one as it gives a cool, menthol taste and feeling to a blend of tea. Licorice is very beneficial to the system and can have a relaxing effect on the nervous system as well as giving a sweet flavor to the blend. Licorice sticks have been chewed during cigarette withdrawal to replace the oral habit and settle down the system. One note about licorice is that it can increase blood pressure in those with hypertension, so use caution when using this herb.

To give you an idea of how important it is to stop smoking at any age, here is a list of risks that are increased every time you take a puff.

Diseases Associated with Smoking

Atherosclerosis - Acute bronchitis Allergies - Hypertension - Chronic bronchitis - Rhinitis - Heart disease - Emphysema Sinusitis - Coronary artery disease - Lung cancer Other infections - Peripheral vascular disease - Mouth cancer Burns Myocardial infarction - Tongue cancer - Peptic ulcers Stroke - Laryngeal cancer Varicose veins - Polycythemia - Esophageal cancer - Hiatal hernia - Low birth weight infants - Bladder cancer -Osteoporosis - Increased infant mortality - Kidney cancer - Periodontal disease - Vitamin/mineral deficiencies - Cervical cancer Senility - Impotence.

Symptoms and Problems Associated with Smoking

Heartburn - Surgical complications Allergies - Nutritional deficiencies - Angina Pectoris Stains on teeth and fingers - Hoarseness - Cough Headaches - Increased caffeine use - Memory loss Anxiety - Increased alcohol use - Fatigue Lowered immunity - Low sexuality - Cold hands and feet Leg pains -

Another important fact that should convince you to quit smoking and stay nicotine free:

Nicotine, the active and addictive ingredient of tobacco, is a mild central nervous system stimulant and a stronger cardiovascular system stimulant. It constricts blood vessels, increases blood pressure, is stimulating to the heart and raises blood fat levels. In its liquid form, nicotine is a powerful poison - the injection of even one drop would be deadly. It is the nicotine, not the smoke, that causes people to continue to smoke cigarettes, but it is the cigarette smoke that causes many of the problems.

Dangers in modern tobacco products include pesticides used during growth and the chemicals added to make it burn better or taste different. Chemicals added to the leaves and papers to enhance burning are among the major causes of fire deaths in this country, as cigarettes continue to burn after they have been put down. The forced burning also makes people smoke more of each cigarette in order to complete it. Sugar curing and rapid flue drying are also associated with increased toxicity of cigarettes. Kerosene heat drying contaminates the tobacco with another toxic hydrocarbon. Using a natural tobacco, such as some imported from France or Germany and a few U.S.-made cigarettes (possibly Shermans and More), may reduce the smoking risk.

An important factor to remember: if a cigarette does not go out when left alone, it has been chemically treated.

Other toxic contaminates in cigarettes include cadmium (which affects the kidneys, arteries, and blood pressure), lead, arsenic, cyanide, and nickel. Dioxin, the most toxic pesticide chemical known to date, has been found in cigarettes. Acetonitrile, another pesticide, is also found in tobacco. The nitrogen gases from cigarettes generate carcinogenic nitrosamines in the tissues; and the tars in smoke contain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), carcinogenic materials that bind with cellular DNA to cause damage. Antioxidant therapy, particularly with vitamin C, is protective against both PAH and nitrosamines, and also blocks the irritating effects of smoke. Smoking itself reduces vitamin C absorption; blood levels of ascorbic acid average about 30-40 percent lower in smokers than in nonsmokers.

AFTER ALL OF THAT, DO YOU REALLY WANT TO CONTINUE TO SMOKE!!!!!!

NICOTINE NUTRIENT PROGRAM

This is a sample supplemental program that can be used as a temporary source of nutrients as you go through the withdrawal/detoxification stage.

*** It is always good to obtain as much of the daily nutrient requirements from the diet; it just may not be feasible to expect to obtain the nutrients in the beginning. Remember that this is just a nutritional program to help your body adjust and heal during the detoxification process***

Water 21/2 - 31/2 qt.

Fat 30 - 50 g.

Fiber 15 - 45 g.

Vitamin A 10,000 - 15,000 IUs

Iodine 150 - 250 mcg.

Beta-carotene 20,000 - 40,000 IUs

Iron women - 20 - 40 mg.

men - 10 - 20 mg.

Vitamin D 200 - 400 IUs

Magnesium 500 - 1,000 mg.

Vitamin E 400 - 800 IUs

Manganese 5 - 10 mg.

Vitamin K 100 - 300 mcg.

Molybdenum 300 - 600 mcg.

Thiamine (B1) 100 - 200 mg.

Potassium 200 - 500 mg.

Riboflavin (B2) 50 - 100 mg.

Selenium 200 - 400 mcg.

Niacinamide (B3) 50 - 100 mg.

Silicon 50 - 150 mg.

Niacin (B3) 100 - 1,000 mg.

Vanadium 150 - 300 mcg.

Pantothenic acid (B5) 250 - 1,000 mg.

Zinc 30 - 75 mg.

Pyridoxine (B6) 50 - 200 mg.

Pyridoxal-5-phosphate 25 - 75 mg.

Coenzyme Q10 20 - 60 mg.

Cobalamin (B12) 200 - 1,000 mcg.

L-amino acids 1,000 - 2,000 mg.

Folic Acid 800 - 2,000 mcg.

L-cysteine 500 - 1,500 mg.

Biotin 200 - 500 mcg.

Glutathione 250 - 500 mg.

Choline 500 - 1,000 mg. (if available)

PABA 500 - 1,500 mg.

Essential fatty acids 4 - 6 capsules

Vitamin C 3 - 12 g.

or Flaxseed oil 2 -3 teaspoons

Bioflavonoids 250 - 750 mg.

Calcium 850 - 1,250 mg.

For withdrawal and detox:

Chromium 200 - 500 mcg.

Garlic 3 - 6 capsules

Copper 2 - 4 mg.

Valerian root 4 - 6 capsules

Lobelia leaf 1 - 2 capsules

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